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Jellyfish

Posted in Invertebrates, Sea Creatures

A jellyfish is a free-swimming marine animal with a jellylike bell or saucer-shaped body. Jellyfish are typically transparent and usually have stinging tentacles around the edge of their bodies.  There are about 200 different species of jellyfish.

 

 

Did-you-know

Jellyfish have no brains, no heart, gills, or even blood!  Jellyfish are not even fish. They are actually considered a type of plankton.

Where-do-they-live

Jellyfish are found in every ocean in the world, from the surface down to the deep, deep sea.

 

 

What-do-they-eat

Jellyfish are carnivores.  They eat fish, shrimp, crabs and tiny plants like plankton and algae. Inside their bell-shaped body is a mouth opening that is used to both eat with and discard waste through. Yuck!

What-are-their-predators

Ocean sunfish and some species of sea turtle are immune to jellyfish venom. Turtles, especially, love jellyfish for dinner.  Jellyfish predators also include swordfish and some species of salmon and tuna.

 

 

What-are-their-defenses

Jellyfish have tiny stinging cells in their tentacles.  They use their tentacles to stun or paralyze their prey before they eat them but it’s also a very powerful defense!

How-fast-do-they-move

Jellyfish can swim by pulsating their bell-shaped bodies.  This propels them through the water at about the same speed as person walking.

 

 

 

 

Danger-scale

 

 

Most jellyfish stings are just annoying and a little painful for a short period of time, but there are a few jellyfish whose sting could kill you.  The sea nettle box jellyfish is the most deadly jellyfish in the world, and one of the most deadly creatures on the planet!

 

 

Can-you-believe

The stinging mechanism in a jellyfish tentacle can be triggered by the lightest touch and can release toxin faster than a gun releases a bullet? Now that’s really fast!

My-favorite-thing

about jellyfish is their defensive sting which can sometimes be just a little painful and other times can be deadly, depending on the kind of jellyfish.

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